Galileo-style Uranus Tour (2003) | WIRED

Uranusprobe

Galileo-style Uranus Tour (2003) | WIRED.

Uranus deserves more attention. There’s something weird about its insides – it should be radiating more heat than it does, but something deep inside keeps it bottled up. Plus its moons are fascinating. An Orbiter, as Dave Portree ably discusses, should be able to use the moons for orbit changes just like the “Galileo” mission did during its 1995-2003 sojourn at Jupiter.

The paper outlining the mission is available here: Feasibility of a Galileo-Style Tour of the Uranian Satellites

Next Big Future: Aragoscope could achieve x1000 higher resolution than Hubble Telescope

aragoscope

Next Big Future: Aragoscope is space telescope system that could achieve 1000 times higher resolution than Hubble Telescope.

Hubble presently resolves Eris into a ~1 pixel wide image (Eris is 2,326 km across and Hubble resolves a spot 1,875 km wide at Eris’s distance), so an Aragoscope would image Eris to a ~1,000 pixel image – thus ~2 km/pixel resolution. Unlike Pluto, there’s no “New Horizons” winging its way to image Eris.

Eris_and_dysnomia2

We could scan the moons of Jupiter at better than Galileo resolution. At just 4 AU, when closest to Earth, we’d see Europa to the ~0.1 km/pixel level. What does that mean? This is Europa at 1 miles (1.6 km) per pixel…

Europa

The moons of Uranus and Neptune would be imaged to the ~same level as the above image of Europa. What’s more they can be studied at leisure, rather than the frantic scramble of a high speed flyby.

Mars can be monitored at the 10 metre/pixel level. Not as good as the rovers on the ground, but a decent bird’s-eye view.

Finally the mysterious possible planets out beyond Neptune, at ~200 to ~250 AU, would be resolved in considerable detail – but first we have to find them.

Just How Special is the Solar System?

Crab Nebula

Alien DUST found at the bottom of the Earth’s ocean | Daily Mail Online.

The punchline is that regular Supernova may not be sufficient to make the heavier elements, like Uranium and Thorium (U & T), that provide much of Earth’s, and other Solar System objects, their long term radiogenic warming. Of course there’s still Potassium 40 (K-40) in other parts of the Galaxy, but if most Supernova debris contains 1% the expect U & T then there’s something different about the supernova that seeded our Solar System with its radioactive isotopes.

The Milky Way – a ‘galactic transport system’

Milky Way Wormhole

In theory, the Milky Way could be a ‘galactic transport system’.

Work by Peter Kuhfittig and colleagues suggests that the “dark mass” of our Galaxy and the super-mass in the Core could be wormholes.

Preprint here:

Possible existence of wormholes in the central regions of halos

Kuhfittig has discussed wormholes in the Halo in a series of wormhole papers: arXiv search

Gravitational lensing of wormholes in the galactic halo region

Possible existence of wormholes in the galactic halo region

Accelerated Travels

Accelerated Travels.

A mathematical discussion of accelerated motion in the relativistic universe. Has some peculiar features when the acceleration is constant – in other discussions this is called the Rindler space-time. The Rindler Horizon forms behind the accelerating observer and strangeness can ensue… at least strange to our Earth-bound eyes.

Humans by the Numbers: Chromosomes, DNA & Genes

Genes & Chromosomes

Chromosome Length (mm) Base pairs Variations Confirmed proteins Putative proteins Pseudo-genes Centromere position (Mbp) Cumulative (%)
1 85 249,250,621 4,401,091 2,012 31 1,130 125 7.9
2 83 243,199,373 4,607,702 1,203 50 948 93.3 16.2
3 67 198,022,430 3,894,345 1,040 25 719 91 23
4 65 191,154,276 3,673,892 718 39 698 50.4 29.6
5 62 180,915,260 3,436,667 849 24 676 48.4 35.8
6 58 171,115,067 3,360,890 1,002 39 731 61 41.6
7 54 159,138,663 3,045,992 866 34 803 59.9 47.1
8 50 146,364,022 2,890,692 659 39 568 45.6 52
9 48 141,213,431 2,581,827 785 15 714 49 56.3
10 46 135,534,747 2,609,802 745 18 500 40.2 60.9
11 46 135,006,516 2,607,254 1,258 48 775 53.7 65.4
12 45 133,851,895 2,482,194 1,003 47 582 35.8 70
13 39 115,169,878 1,814,242 318 8 323 17.9 73.4
14 36 107,349,540 1,712,799 601 50 472 17.6 76.4
15 35 102,531,392 1,577,346 562 43 473 19 79.3
16 31 90,354,753 1,747,136 805 65 429 36.6 82
17 28 81,195,210 1,491,841 1,158 44 300 24 84.8
18 27 78,077,248 1,448,602 268 20 59 17.2 87.4
19 20 59,128,983 1,171,356 1,399 26 181 26.5 89.3
20 21 63,025,520 1,206,753 533 13 213 27.5 91.4
21 16 48,129,895 787,784 225 8 150 13.2 92.6
22 17 51,304,566 745,778 431 21 308 14.7 93.8
X 53 155,270,560 2,174,952 815 23 780 60.6 99.1
Y 20 59,373,566 286,812 45 8 327 12.5 100
mtDNA 0.0054 16,569 929 13 0 0 N/A 100
TOTALS 1,052 3,095,677,412 55,757,749 19,300 738 12,859

[Table by Tableizer]